NASA Image od the day

The latest NASA "Image of the Day" image.
  1. This image captures a close-up view of a storm with bright cloud tops in the northern hemisphere of Jupiter.
  2. What's in a name? If your name is Strong Thermal Emission Velocity Enhancement aka STEVE, then there's quite bit behind the name.
  3. Just by determining how circular a given crater is – using pi and the crater’s perimeter and area – planetary geologists can reveal clues about how the crater was formed and the surface that was impacted.
  4. Not everyone gets to become a part of history, but mathematician Billie Robertson is one of the lucky ones. In this image taken on Nov. 27, 1972, she was running a real-time simulation of Translunar Injection (TLI) Go-No-Go for the Apollo 17 lunar landing mission.
  5. Cassini captured this striking view of Saturn’s moon Dione on July 23, 2012.
  6. The crew aboard the International Space Station have grown two batches of mixed greens (mizuna, red romaine lettuce and tokyo bekana cabbage), and are now running two Veggie facilities simultaneously.
  7. Known as the 'Mother of Hubble,' Nancy Grace Roman is shown here at the Yerkes Observatory, University of Chicago in 1948, where she was studying for her doctorate in astronomy.
  8. The intertank is the second piece of structural hardware for the massive Space Launch System core stage, built at NASA's Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans and delivered to Marshall Space Flight Center for testing.
  9. This image was originally meant to track the movement of sand dunes near the North Pole of Mars, but what's on the ground in between the dunes is just as interesting!
  10. Astronauts Joan Higginbotham (foreground) and Suni Williams refer to a procedures checklist as they work the controls of the Canadarm2, in this 2006 image.